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Lime putty

Lime

Lime is the most important ingredient in a marmorino finish.  It acts as the binder.  We use three types of lime: natural hydraulic lime for base layers, Marrakesh lime for tadelakt and grassello di calce - aged lime putty - for marmorino finishes and buon fresco.

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Marble dusts in various grades, from very coarse sand to fine flour, act as the aggregate in marmorino finishes.  Coloured marble dust is employed in very old techniques such as marmorino veneziano.

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Pigments

Pigments

We pigment our stucco by grinding natural earths and oxides.  The subtle hues produced using these natural pigments is completely different and vastly superior to those produced using synthetic colours.

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Oils are added to marmorino for two reasons: linseed oil is added to improve the working characteristics of the material; while a variety of essential oils can be added to introduce fragrance.

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Savon de Marseilles

Soap

Savon de Marseilles and black soap are the final treatments for both marmorino and tadelakt finishes.  The fresh lime and soap react to create a hydrophobic surface.

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Glass has been traditionally used as an aggregate with lime plaster finishes since the earliest times.  Indian plasterers applied glass powder to the surface of wet chaum.  It can be used exclusively or as an additive to marmorino to introduce interest.  Colours that work especially well are Egyptian blue and green frit.

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Mica

Mica

Mica, is a mineral with a lamellar (gill-like) shape.  It forms glistening scales which are added, in various grades, to marmorino to introduce a highly effective yet subtle sparkle.  It is not immediately apparent, but with appropriate lighting it becomes visible and adds an extra dimension to the finish.

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Selenite, sometimes known as moonstone, is a transparent gypsum used for scagliola.  It produces very hard surfaces and is ideal for polishing with snakestone.  It also takes pigment very well.  Gypsum is also added to marmorino when carrying out stucco forte, which is freehand-modelled ornamentation.  It is also employed when producing spatolato Veneziano.

Gypsum accelerates the setting process of marmorino, which means that thicker layers can be built up when carrying out raised relief and ornamentation, without having to completely rely on the recarbonisation process of the lime.

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